Sweet As

I’ve taken some time off the blog because I was writing for the local paper and doing some of my own writing but now I’ve got some time and space to get back to blogging.

We’ve been in New Zealand for nearly six months now and I think all of us are feeling just a bit more Kiwi with each passing day.

One way you can tell how much, or how little, you are picking up and fitting into a culture is through language. The Kiwis, like most people and cultures, have unique ways of speaking and phrases that are distinct to them. And we have found that over time and for better and for worse, we are incorporating Kiwi-speak into our daily speech patterns.

Shortly after we arrived I remember talking to a guy in Whakatane. He asked me how long we were staying and I told him about a year to which he responded, “Sweet as.” I cocked my head to the side and gave him a quizzical look, “Sweet as what?” I wondered aloud. It was his turn at that point to cock his head to the side and flash a quizzical look at me. “What do you mean? Just sweet as.”

Over the course of the next few weeks I noticed that this phrase, this partial simile, showed up over and over in Kiwi conversation. A nice surfboard was “cool as,” a tasty treat was “good as,” the ocean on a brisk day was “cold as,” really hot coffee was “hot as” and a red and gold sunset was “beautiful as.”

IMG_7817
A “beautiful as” day at Otarawairere Bay

At those early stages of our time here, I remember thinking to myself, “God, that’s the weirdest phrase I’ve ever heard,” and promising myself that I would never pick up that habit.

At that point and time I was not comfortable at all with this linguistic pull up. I like my similes to be completed, not half stated and then left to dangle over the edge of interpretation.

IMG_7794
The “small as” Whakatane airport

Before I knew it though, my son, who is attending the local middle school, started peppering his chatter with this Kiwi-ism. “How was your day at school, son?” I’d ask, to which he’d nonchalantly reply, “Good as.” The first few weeks, I’d just shake my head, open my eyes real wide and ask, “Good as what? Your day has to be as good as something else! It can’t just be ‘good as. That just doesn’t make sense!” Of course, this is exactly what a 12-year old wants to hear. “Ah ha,” I could hear him thinking, “something else to annoy Dad. Duly noted.” Before long, my daughter had picked it up. When I got my new surfboard, she looked up at me and declared, “Dad, that is a sweet as surfboard!” [emphasis hers]

 

IMG_7772
My “long as” surf board

Sujata was next to go down that slippery slope of nebulous figurative speech. Her day at work was “Good as,” the tacos I made that night were “Delicious as!” the surf yesterday was “choppy as” and her Pilates class that afternoon was “hard as.”

IMG_7812
Our “excellent as” friend, Chris

The longer I’m here, though, the more I’m starting to realize that this way of speaking really fits Kiwi culture. New Zealanders are nothing if not laid back and their live-and-let-live worldview trickles down even into their speech patterns. There’s no need to finish the metaphor here—the listener will pick up your meaning and silently nod her head in approval. Or not. The incomplete simile is also, in many ways, a real testament to the collaborative nature of New Zealanders and their faith in human understanding. Here in New Zealand, the metaphor doesn’t need to be completed—the point does not need to be driven home and it’s the very incompleteness of the phrase that binds the speaker and the listener together. We understand each other to such a degree and on such a deep level that we don’t even need to finish what remains to be said.

All this is to say that I finally gave in and if you were to come by our house tonight and ask me how my day was or how the surf looks for tomorrow, I’d probably turn to you, smile, and say, “Sweet as.”

 

6 thoughts on “Sweet As

  1. Sweet as, Eric.
    Ah, one’s first “sweet as’ moments are memorable. Joyce, my American friend from North Carolina, was watching her son’s, middle school ruby game, when a man behind her called out, “sweet as’ ! To her southern ear, his Kiwi accent, made ‘as’ sound like ‘ass’.

  2. Good on you, Eric! I love sweet as almost as much I love Good as gold and good on you. Of course, there are HEAPS of other Kiwisms! Can’t wait to see you. I’m buying my tickets just after the new year.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s